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Collection: Ceramic Ware

7 products
  • Kiseto Dish and Choko Cup Set
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    $353.28
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  • Mino Old Dyed Striped Dishes and Soba Choko Cup Set
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    $353.28
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  • Small Mino Old Dyed Fireworks Half Dish
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    $428.16
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    $428.16
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  • Medium Mino Old Dyed Fireworks Half Bowl
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    $203.52
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  • Large Mino Old Dyed Fireworks Half Bowl
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    $357.12
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  • Toki-oi
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    $1,038.72
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    $1,038.72
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  • Toki-oi/small
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    $83.52
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What's Mino ware?

Of all Gifu’s rich and varied crafts, none have had an impact on Japan like Mino ware ceramics. Born more than 1,300 years ago, Mino ware now accounts for more than 50 percent of all ceramics made in Japan.
Referring to pottery produced mainly in the southeastern Gifu cities of Tajimi, Toki, Mizunami and Kani, one of its modern-day features is that it isn’t confined to tight parameters.
It can be made by hand on the smallest of scales or mass-produced in factories, and artisans in the region are known to apply their time-honored techniques to creating a diverse range of products and styles. Anything goes.
That said, there are certain styles that are distinctly Mino.
The black finish of Setoguro, the light reddish tones of Shino, and the green-hued Oribe, which takes its name from 16th-century samurai and tea ceremony master Furuta Oribe, are all traditional Mino-ware standouts.
At workshops around southeastern Gifu, you can try making your own version of Mino ware, or stop by kilns to learn about the varying approaches artisans take to their craft.
And, of course, there are plenty of places to pick up a special Mino-ware souvenir or two as well.


Oribe